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Welcome!

March 13, 2012

This site is about getting your first job as a humanitarian aid worker. Whether you want to run refugee camps, micro-credit programs or health programs, this is my personal opinion (not my employer’s) about ways to make the transition to international relief and development work.

If you find this site at least as useful as a coffee and a bagel, and wonder how you can possibly thank me, please consider buying my e-book on Amazon! Getting your first job in relief and development. It also helps me to recover some of the costs of hosting this site when people review the e-book – thanks!

My take on getting a job as a humanitarian aid worker is organized by chapters (on the right-hand side under the heading Book chapters) – and is supposed to be read top-to-bottom more or less like a book. Book reviews and other pieces are posted below. Find out more about this blog here.

Please read the disclaimer, and understand that this line of work is not risk free. You need to do your own research, make your own decisions, and take responsibility for them.

If this site is as useful to you as a book you might have paid for please consider buying my new Kindle eBook, which contains much of the content from this site, thoughtfully formatted for off-line reading on a Kindle, iPad, laptop, or other e-reader. It’s $7.99, and honestly, what can you get for that these days? Get it here.

If you have questions please do send them either by email or in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them or find someone who can. I also offer individual coaching services for people who have in-depth questions about their particular situation, want feedback and support with resumes and cover letters, or want interview coaching and critique. To learn more about that see my career coaching page.We answer phones at a relief org, and we direct almost all of our requests for informational interviews to this resource. It's an honest, clear summary of what you need in order to work in international relief. Thanks for this great reference.

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Grassroots environmental and humanitarian work?

August 18, 2017

Q. Hi Nick,
I’m 21 years old recently dropped out of university. Highest education qualification is graduating from High School. Very minimal practical work experience. I’ve always aspired to go into grassroots environmental and humanitarian work. Do you have any tips or suggestions of how I can make this possible. Tips on where to look for volunteering opportunities or even possibly entry level employment?

Cheers 🙂 Zoe

A. Hi Zoe,

Thanks for the question. I guess I’d ask you to think concretely about the kinds of jobs that you want to be doing in 2-3 years time. Take a look on LinkedIn or other job / networking sites, and rummage around – make a shortlist of organizations you are interested in and bookmark some actual jobs that you think would be interesting to you.

Once you’ve done that, start to think about what kinds of education and experience those jobs need and ask for. You don’t mention why you dropped out of university, but I would strongly urge you to reconsider that decision. The vast majority of people working in this industry have at least a bachelors degree – by not completing that you’re putting yourself at a huge disadvantage.

Good luck, let us know how you do,

Nick

A year off to do international aid work?

July 17, 2017
Q. Hey Nick,
I am 21 years old and I have worked in Turkey and Vietnam doing physical/psychological therapy. I have backpacked, hitchhiked, and bused through 16 countries on 3 different continents now and later this year I will be traveling through Peru and Bolivia (Continent #4 :). In a couple years I will be finishing my undergraduate in Global Public Health and Biology at UC San Diego.
I speak basic Turkish and am learning Spanish. I plan on applying to medical school once I graduate but want to take a year off to continue to pursue work in international aid. What organizations would you recommend I apply to after college or even during college?
I don’t have any preference to where in the world I go as long as it doesn’t snow.
Steven
A. Hi Steven,
It sounds like you’ve had a pretty busy time in college – you’re doing all the right things building a resume of experience living and working overseas, but your question brings into focus a trend that’s been going on in international relief and development for a couple of decades now – that is it’s continuing professionalization.
It used to be that a lot of agencies would take folks without a lot of professional skills to work on relief and development projects. There are still a couple of these, but to be honest I’m not sure that I recommend them.
The thing is – while your resume is pretty interesting for someone your age, recruiters are not going to find it that compelling in terms of filling positions overseas.
It comes down to the demographics of aid agency staff – in most countries some 90-95% of staff are from the country in question – the foreigners (expats) make up 5-10% of the staff, and fill those positions that can’t be recruited locally, either very senior management, or some technical speciality like engineering, public health, or conflict management.
While your experience doing therapeutic work and your public health education is valuable, it’s not going to qualify you for positions that require an MPH or therapeutic qualification – imagine what you would think about a Turkish undergraduate showing up in California to help Americans – I think we’d be a little uncomfortable with it.
I want to encourage you to continue your engagement with this work, and explore it as something that might be a good fit for you later in your career, but not as something to do during a year off – its a profession, and is increasingly being treated that way by recruiters.
Good luck!
Nick

Do I need a degree to work in humanitarian aid?

July 11, 2017

Q. Hey Nick!
Don’t worry I won’t ask if there’s a specific degree I should get to land a job in humanitarian aid 😅
What I was curious about though was whether you think anyone would look at my resume with a diploma and a specialized certificate as opposed to a degree? I work in logistics and have 4+ years in supply chain management but got into the work with no credentials. I have also travelled extensively and sit on the board of directors for a preschool in Rwanda, which I have volunteered at as well. I’m looking at getting back into school, but am not sure I can get through a full 4 year degree at my age, while juggling my current work and living situation (I have to study part-time so a 4 year degree will actually take me closer to 5-6 to complete)
I don’t need the diploma/degree for my current work, so I don’t want to go back for the diploma if it won’t help me find work.
Sorry for rambling!

Mathew

A. Thanks Mathew – I appreciate you pitching me a new one!

OK – so – my usual advice is that a degree is pretty much the baseline for jobs in humanitarian aid these days. Most jobs require one, and most times CVs without one (particularly entry-level) will be discarded.

That said – your case is a little different – you have extensive experience in a relevant field, and it sounds like at least a little bit of overseas experience. Once a resume has a few jobs and years of relevant field experience, most recruiters won’t look at your degree (or not, as the case may be). I know several people without degrees who work in this field, and I don’t think it’s an issue once you’re established. I know that I have never once, in over 20 years, been asked to provide evidence of my education, or even asked about it.

Don’t ever lie or misrepresent yourself, but I would encourage you to simply write a resume that emphasizes your work experience and doesn’t draw attention to your educational background. I bet if you don’t mention it 90% of recruiters are not even going to notice. If they do, simply be honest, and explain it to them the way you did to me.

Good luck!

Nick

Remembering Otto Warmbier

June 19, 2017

I want us to spend a moment today remembering the life of Otto Warmbier, who died this week after returning home following over a year of detention in North Korea. Job-seekers in this line of work are often told to seek experience visiting, living, and working in the kinds of places where development and relief takes place. Otto’s tragedy is a reminder that this can be a dangerous thing.

I don’t know any aid workers who don’t have a story or two about a close call. These are often told as badges of honor, but we need to always remember that the line between a great story and a tragic headline can be very fine. Read some of Otto’s story here, and please, please travel safely, wherever you are going.

Do I need a degree to do humanitarian work?

May 10, 2017
Q. Dear Nick,
Thank you so much for the useful information. I have a quick question for you. Do I absolutely have to have a degree to do humanitarian work? I am 36 years old and am willing and wanting to volunteer but do not know if the degree is worth going back to school for at this point. It seems to me that volunteering would make more sense and make more of a difference.
Thanks!
Heather
A. Hi Heather,
While there are some people who make a career in humanitarian work without a degree, they are few and far between. Without a degree you will fail most recruiting screens and your resume won’t get presented to hiring managers. The only way you’re going to get hired without a degree is to have some really compelling skills or experience, or make great contacts in the field and get hired on using a less formal channel.
It’s not impossible, but getting a degree is pretty much a requirement theses days.
Good luck!
Nick
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I just want to let people know that there’s a new way to support this blog (other than buying my ebook!) – you can make a contribution through Patreon – it really helps me to offset the costs of running the site when people kick in the cost of a cup of coffee!

INGO nursing jobs

May 4, 2017

Q. Hi Nick,

First of all, thank you for your blog and your insights. I’m a 25 years old nurse from Belgium with a specialization in community health. I worked in several countries, for example, in Guatemala with homeless youth in Guatemala City, Burkina Faso in a rural clinic center, in Belgium with homeless adults/families/asylum seekers etc. and for now, I am working as a medical case manager for homeless youths based in New Jersey in the United States.

I completed certificates in International Humanitarian Law with the CICR and a Humanitarian Healthcare Provider Program. I really want to work in relief and development, which is my goal since I’m 16. But it feels like most of the NGOs are looking for a project/program manager, media communication officer, monitoring, and evaluation specialist etc. not a nurse. What should I do? Getting more professional experience as a nurse then do the tropical medicine course of should I do a master in project management or others?

Thank you
Marjorie

A. Hi Marjorie,

Thanks for the kind words – first off I just want to let people know that there’s a new way to support this blog (other than buying my ebook!) – you can make a contribution through Patreon – it really helps me to offset the costs of running the site when people kick in the cost of a cup of coffee!

Ok – to your question – it sounds like you have the kinds of qualifications that a medical agency would be looking for in deploying nurses – and I’d be interested to hear about which organizations you’re targeting. My suspicion is that you’re looking at the general job listings for international agencies and noticing that most of them are not for nurses?

That’s certainly true – most agencies don’t field front-line medical teams, and of those that do, most jobs are not nursing. That said, there are a few that do. Since you’re in the US I would check out MSF (check out my interview with MSF Canada’s recruiters here), IMC, and the ICRC as a start. All of these groups recruit nurses for field postings. I would see if you can get one of their recruiters to chat with you about what specific requirements they want from nurses, and whether your resume stacks up in that regard.

As to whether you should do a Masters in Project Management, that sort of depends on how passionate you are about project management. Mid career that might not be a bad move if you really want to get out of nursing and move into line management, but at this point I wouldn’t advise you to quit looking for nursing positions.

Let us know how you do!

Nick

 

Your chance to get involved – Patreon launch!

April 5, 2017

Folks!

I’ve always wanted this site to be a free resource, and that’s a vision I plan to stick to. Keeping the site up-to-date and adding new material takes time and effort though, and I’ve decided to launch a Patreon to help offset the costs and keep this a project that I can prioritize.

The site will remain free, but Patreon supporters will get to help pick topics and interview candidates, as well as get access to job-search resources that are not on the site currently. Please consider subscribing for as little as a dollar a month – if even a fraction of the tens of thousands of people who use the site monthly are able to do this I can kick the site up a notch in terms of new content!

Please click here and sign up!

Thank you!

 

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